Tag Archives: salary cap

Emmerton placed on waivers; Helm heading to long-term injured reserve

DETROIT – Simply put, Cory Emmerton was a victim of a numbers game.

The Wings placed the fourth-line center on waivers Sunday to trim $533,333 off their salary cap.

“In order to get cap compliant this is one move we had to make,” Wings general manager Ken Holland said in a phone interview Sunday after the move. “First off, let’s see if he clears. If he clears we know what he can do. If he’s claimed he’s off the books, if he’s not claimed we have the ability to send him down.”

If Emmerton, 25, isn’t claimed the Wings plan to send in to Grand Rapids.

Holland also said that Darren Helm (back) will be placed on long-term injured reserve to begin the season, which sheds another $2.125 million off the salary cap.

“He’s played one game in 18 months, he’s just starting to get up and running,” Holland said. “He’s had a couple of practices but it’s going to take a while.”

The Wings are currently three players over the roster size of 26 and roughly $2.4 million over the salary cap.

Those two moves help get them under the cap, but another player move still needs to be made and they have many options.

Patrick Eaves (sprained MCL and ankle), Jonas Gustavsson (groin) and Jordin Tootoo (shoulder) all are sidelined with injuries.

Eaves and Gustavsson appear headed to the IR, but it’s not determined if it’ll be long-term or short-term stints for them. Both will be re-examined by doctors Monday.

Tootoo is the closest to returning, but he could also begin the season on short-term IR.

Players placed on short-term injured reserve (minimum seven days) provide no cap relief, but it does open up a roster spot, while long-term trips (minimum 10 games and 24 days) provide cap relief.

If the Wings place Gustavsson on short-term IR, they’ll need to free up more cap space because his $1.5 million salary will count against cap and Petr Mrazek’s salary of $790,000 would also count.

That scenario would more than likely get Gustav Nyquist sent to Grand Rapids to begin the season, at least temporarily. His cap his is $950,000. Nyquist and Danny DeKeyser are both exempt from having to clear waivers to go back to the minors.

“Tomorrow we’ll assess what other moves we have to make,” said Holland, who added no one else will be placed on waivers.

Rosters must be set by 5 p.m. on Monday. The Wings open the season Wednesday at home against the Buffalo Sabres.

Joakim Andersson will be the team’s third-line center until Helm returns. Riley Sheahan or Luke Glendening could serve as the fourth-line center until Helm gets back.

“In the short term we’ll be a little challenged (at center) until Helm gets back,” Holland said.

The Wings hope Emmerton, who was taken 41st overall in the 2006 draft, clears waivers to provide depth in the organization. In parts of three seasons he had 12 goals and seven assists in 121 games.

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Cleary has “serious” offer from another team, but wants to remain with Wings

DETROIT – Daniel Cleary wants to remain a Detroit Red Wing.

The problem is that probably won’t happen because there just isn’t room on the roster for the 34-year-old forward.

“We’ve been talking since July 5,” Cleary said Friday as he joined a number of his former teammates at Joe Louis Arena for an informal skate. “We’ll see this weekend. I’ll make a decision Sunday. I’m talking to three other teams. It won’t be an easy decision to make. We’ll see how it goes.”

The Wings are already two over the roster limit of 23 as they head into training camp next week in Traverse City and $637,000 over the salary cap.

“I’ve got options,” Cleary said. “I just want to make the right call for my family. I’ve talked to Kenny (Holland) and we all know what he’s trying to do. We’re all in agreement that I want to come back, they want me back so we’ll see.”

Cleary did add he has a “serious” offer from one team, but would not be more specific.

“I want to stay in Detroit,” Cleary said. “I think I’ve made that pretty clear. I’ve been pretty patient. I’ve had other opportunities to leave and just didn’t want to leave. I’ve just tried to wait as long as I could for Detroit to make the right moves, I guess. That’s all I can say right now.”

Cleary did admit picturing himself back in Detroit was a tough call.

Holland has extended Cleary an invitation to training camp on a pro tryout, but with no guarantee of a contract. Coincidently, that’s how he began his career in Detroit in 2005.

“I’m not so much concerned about signing a deal,” Cleary said. “I’m going to go to camp with a deal agreed on. I hope it’s here. If it’s not I have other options.”

Cleary said the Wings made him an offer on July 3 that he felt he didn’t deserve.

“As the days went on we kind of kept talking more and more,” Cleary said. “You have to move stuff to make it happen.”

When Cleary turned down the offer Detroit began shopping and inked Daniel Alfredsson and Stephen Weiss to deals on the first day free agents could sign.

They also re-signed forwards Drew Miller, Joakim Andersson and Gustav Nyquist. That gives the Wings 16 forwards under contract for next season.

The health of Darren Helm remains in question. And the only other forward the Wings can send to Grand Rapids without having to clear waivers is Nyquist.

“I’ve got a good relationship with Kenny,” Cleary said. “I’ve talked to (coach Mike Babcock) a lot this summer. I’m trying to make it work, trying to get something done. It’s not easy to do, but I understand what Kenny has to do. I guess it’s proven a little more difficult than he has anticipated. So I don’t know what I’m going to do.”

Cleary, who had nine goals and six assists in 48 games during the lockout-shortened season last year, has flourished since he joined the Wings for the 2005-06 season.

He’s spent eight seasons in Detroit and has reached the 20-goal plateau three times.

He was also the team’s second leading scorer in last year’s playoffs with four goals and six assists in 10 games.

“I would like to make a decision Sunday,” Cleary said. “I’ve got a great deal right now I can take. But I don’t even … I don’t know.”

Cleary was a first round draft pick, 13th overall, by the Chicago Blackhawks in the 1997 NHL Entry Draft.

Andersson gets two-year deal worth $2.525 million

DETROIT – And now there is just one.

On Tuesday, the Wings signed restricted free agent center Joakim Andersson to a two-year deal worth $1.465 million.

That leaves forward Gustav Nyquist as Detroit’s last restricted free agent that needs to be signed before training camp begins in September.

On July 16, defenseman Brendan Smith inked a two-year deal worth $2.525 million. He was the only restricted free agent to file for arbitration.

Andersson, whose deal will have an annual salary-cap hit of $732,000, will make $700,000 this season and $732,000 in the final year of the deal.

The one thing the Wings love about Andersson is his size and grit.

“I like smart and I like big guys,” Wings coach Mike Babcock said of Andersson last season.

Andersson, who’s 6-foot-2, 206 pounds, spent most of the season in Detroit after Darren Helm was sidelined most of the year with a back injury.

“We had so many kids that really improved and made us better,” Babcock said last season. “That’s allowed us to play better. We have more depth.”

Andersson, 24, centered the third line most of last regular season, registering three goals and five assists in 38 games.

He had a goal and four assists in 14 playoff games.

The signing does increase the Wings’ roster size to 24 and that will go up one once Nyquist gets his deal done. That’s two over the league limit and puts them close to $3 million over the salary cap.

Teams can also go 10 percent over the salary cap during the offseason, but that’s something Detroit doesn’t want to do.

The Wings do have a bit of flexibility with this year’s cap if they choose to apply Daniel Alfredsson’s potential $2 million in bonuses to next season since that cap number is expected to rise.

Detroit isn’t completely sure if Helm will be ready when training camp arrives.

Helm was limited to playing just one game last season due to a slightly torn disc in his back. He took part in the Wings’ development camp last week to test his health and it seemed to go well.

If Helm is unable to start the season the Wings could place him on long-term injured reserve and thus create a roster spot there. It would also allow his $1.75 in salary to not count against the salary cap.

The list of possible players to be trimmed from the roster via trade includes Jordin Tootoo, Mikael Samuelsson and Patrick Eaves.

The Wings have had discussions with Nashville about sending Tootoo, who has two years left on a deal at $1.9 million a season, back to the Predators.

Eaves’ game is comparable to that of Miller.

Cory Emmerton appears safe on the roster if Helm is unable to regain his pre-injury form to center the Wings’ third line. That would more than likely secure Andersson to centering the third line and allow Emmerton to center the fourth line, like he did most of last season.

There’s also a chance Detroit could welcome Daniel Cleary back, but only if a deal can be made to shed salary.

“We’re comfortable where we’re at right now,” Wings general manager Ken Holland said earlier this offseason. “But if we do anything else we’d have to move somebody first.

“We’d like to do a move or two, I’m not sure we can,” Holland added. “If we can’t make a move I’m OK with our team, we’ll go to camp. If we can make a move and free up some money then certainly re-signing Dan Cleary is a possibility.”

If Detroit can’t trade players off its roster it could still trim them when the regular buyout period in August begins, but two thirds of those salaries would count toward the cap.

After the Wings were eliminated from the playoff, Andersson and a number of his teammates helped lead the Grand Rapids Griffins win the Calder Cup.

“These are great experiences,” Wings general manager Ken Holland said in the offseason. “When you’re a young player nothing can be better for your development than going on a run in the AHL playoffs. It’s a roller-coaster ride, physically and emotionally. This is an experience we can’t replicate in development camp or training camp.”

Babcock credits Andersson’s and the other rookie’s quick development to coach Jeff Blashill, who was a Wings assistant for one season (2011-12).

“Blash is doing a heck of a job there,” Babcock said last season. “We haven’t had a team be a playoff team in Grand Rapids in a long time (since 2009). It’s important they win down there. We’ve got some guys that are really knocking on the door for jobs.”

The Wings selected Andersson in the third round, 88th overall, of the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.

As expected, Colaiacovo clears waivers and will be bought out by Wings

DETROIT – Defenseman Carlo Colaiacovo cleared unconditional waivers and the final year of his contract will be bought out by the Wings.

The moves sheds $2.5 million off Detroit’s salary cap for next season.

Teams are permitted two amnesty buyouts that can be used this summer or next summer.

They would be able to buy out a player at two-thirds of the remaining value of the contract and not have any of the salary count against the salary cap.

Colaiacovo’s actual salary is $2.85 million next season, which means the Wings will pay him roughly $1.9 million over the next two seasons.

Colaiacovo, 30, was not the top-tier defenseman the Wings were looking for last offseason, but was the best option left on free-agent market.

The Wings were in need of a top four defenseman last offseason after losing Nicklas Lidstrom (retirement) and Brad Stuart (trade) this offseason.

And the biggest concern when he signed was his health and that surfaced again this year.

Colaiacovo, who has yet to play more than 67 games in any season, played in just six regular season games after suffering a sprained left shoulder in just the second game of the lockout shortened season.

He wound up playing just six games during the regular season, recording an assist and was a minus-4.

Carlo Colaiacovo will be placed on unconditional waivers at noon Wednesday with the Wings intending to buy out the final year of his contract

DETROIT – A league source has confirmed that defenseman Carlo Colaiacovo will be placed on unconditional waivers at noon Wednesday with the Wings intending to buy out the final year of his contract.

Colaiacovo has one year left on a two-year deal he signed last offseason.

The move clears $2.5 million in salary-cap space next season.

Teams are permitted two amnesty buyouts that can be used this summer or next summer.

They would be able to buy out a player at two-thirds of the remaining value of the contract and not have any of the salary count against the salary cap.

Colaiacovo’s actual salary is $2.85 million next season, which means the Wings will pay him roughly $1.9 million over the next two seasons.

The team also does not intend to buy out Todd Bertuzzi, who has a one year left on a deal with a cap hit of $2.075 million.

As for Mikael Samuelsson, he’s not eligible to be bought out because of his injured pectoral muscle. If the Wings deemed him healthy, Samuelsson, who will make $3 million in the final year of his deal, could dispute it.

With the buyout of Colaiacovo the Wings are in need of a veteran for Grand Rapids for insurance or they could try and swing a trade for a top four defenseman.

The move could also be to clear space so they can pursue Vancouver Canucks defenseman Alexander Edler.

At the NHL Entry Draft on Sunday, Detroit was among several teams to make a pitch to the Canucks for Edler.

The Canucks didn’t deal Edler and on July 1 he had a no-trade clause kick in.

Edler, 27, begins a new six-year deal at a $5 million salary-cap hit a season.

The Wings were in need of a top four defenseman last offseason after losing Nicklas Lidstrom (retirement) and Brad Stuart (trade) this offseason.

Detroit currently has six defensemen under contract for next season.

Brendan Smith is a restricted free agent and will get a deal done bringing the total to seven on the blue line heading to training camp.

The Wings have a number of defensemen coming up through the ranks, including Ryan Sproul, Xavier Oullette and Mattias Backman.

Detroit just re-signed restricted free agent Jakub Kindl to a four-year extension worth $9.6 million.

Kindl, 26, had four goals and nine assists in 41 games last season and was a plus-15, second only to Pavel Datsyuk (plus-21) on the team.

Kindl got a considerable raise after making $1.05 million last season. His average salary over the next four seasons is $2.4 million.

Colaiacovo, 30, was not the top-tier defenseman the Wings were looking for last offseason, but was the best option left on free-agent market.

The biggest concern was his health and that surfaced again this year.

Colaiacovo played in just six regular season games after suffering a sprained left shoulder in just the second game of the lockout shortened season.

He wound up playing just six games during the regular season, recording an assist and was a minus-4.

His game seemed to pick up in the playoffs when he replaced Brian Lashoff on the blue line, appearing in nine games. He had an assist and was a plus-3.

He has yet to play more than 67 games in any season.

Colaiacovo, who was drafted 17th overall by Toronto in the 2001 NHL Entry Draft, has some offensive ability and is a good puck mover.

Holland says Wings won’t use amnesty buyout on Franzen, who’s set to make close to $4 million each of the next seven seasons

DETROIT – Johan Franzen will come back.

Wings GM Ken Holland also said he would not use one of the club’s two amnesty buyouts on Franzen.

“Yeah, it’s crazy (speculation) for me,” Holland said. “I don’t know where you find 30-goal scorers. There is no hockey store. He played 41 games, he had 14 goals. If you times it by two, that’s 28 goals. How many players in the league score more than 25 goals?”

Franzen will make close to $4 million each of the next seven seasons before becoming an unrestricted free agent.

Teams have two amnesty buyouts that can be used over the next two summers, where they can buyout a player for two-thirds of the remaining value of his contract.

The move would not count against the salary cap.

“Obviously it’s at our disposal,” Holland said when asked if he’d use it on any players.