Tag Archives: Luke Glendening

Loss of Glendening sparks Lightning comeback win

DETROIT >> With seven minutes and 28 seconds left in the third period, the tide of the Wings’ best-of-seven shifted for their favor to Tampa Bay’s all because the loss of one player … Luke Glendening.

Glendening went out after getting into a scuffle with Victor Hedman after suffering a right-hand injury and needed to be stitched up.

Glendening didn’t return to the game.

And during his absence, the Lightning scored three unanswered goals, all from their triplet line, to even the series with Detroit, 2-2, after a 3-2 win in overtime.

“I’ve watched him in the minors,” Tampa Bay coach Jon Cooper said. “I watched him play when they unfortunately beat us in the Calder Cup. He’s, I don’t know how to describe, he’s an extremely responsible player. There aren’t a lot of guys out there like the Glendenings. He’s done a heck of a job on our guys.

“To lose a player that plays an extremely important role for them, you look back know because we came back to win the game, so it was potentially a huge factor,” Cooper continued. “He’s a good player for them. There’s no question it had an effect because the triplet line there. They just have a vibe going on that first one and for him not to be around I’m sure there was a little bit of an effect.”

Glendening’s line, with wingers Drew Miller and Landon Ferraro, had put the clamps on Tyler Johnson, Ondrej Palat and Nikita Kucherov for nearly six periods at Joe Louis Arena.

That was until Glendening wen out.

“Obviously it was big play in the game,” Wings coach Mike Babcock said. “I really thought we should be going on the power play there but I can’t control those things. Obviously getting his hand cut and missing the rest of the game matchup-wise, Johnson’s line got the next three goals.”

Johnson scored his first of two with 5:26 left in regulation and Glendening off the ice getting stitches after him and Hedman were sent off for roughing.

Johnson setup Palat for the equalizer just over a minute later.

“That’s just the way the game goes,” Glendening said. “Obviously I was frustrated not being able to be out there. He’s a dynamite player and when he gets time and space he can do special things.

Then, Johnson ended it just 2:25 into overtime.

“I don’t know, you’d have to ask Johnson,” Babcock said when asked why Glendening is so good against the Johnson line. “He’s a good player, he plays hard, he can skate. We think he’s OK. Just like all injuries in playoffs. You really don’t know until game time but the doc says they sewed him up and he’s going to be fine.”

Johnson now has four goals and an assist in the series.

“Just trying to limit their time and space,” Glendening said. “Miller and Ferraro have been great, trying to control the puck when we can. Blocking shots.”

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Phantom goalie interference call on Glendening calls for expanded replay

DETROIT >> Wings coach Mike Babcock had this to say on the phantom goalie interference call on Luke Glendening that led to a Washington power play and a disallowed goal for the Wings on Wednesday.

“When you’re done complaining and whining about it, by the time that’s all done, they can have it right,” Babcock said. “It takes two seconds to get it right. The referee never wants to get it wrong. He doesn’t want to watch the replay for three weeks of him getting it wrong either. He’d rather have it right.”

Glendening wasn’t even close to Caps goalie Braden Holtby when he was called for the penalty.

“I imagine the way it happened, you see the goalie laying there and you see the shot go in the net,” Babcock said. “He says, ‘I can’t him a goal he tripped a guy,’ so you call a penalty because that’s what happens naturally. You don’t a goalie is going to fall down. “In the end he got it wrong.”

Last year against the Kings, the Wings tied the game up when a puck hit off the mesh behind the net, bounced back and hit Jonathan Quick in the back before trickling into the net.

The goal was credited by Niklas Kronwall. The Wings went onto win the game in a shootout.

“But the time we got all this screwing around with we could have got it right,” Babcock said. “I think the league wants to get it right. I’m not in charge of this stuff and I don’t know how to do it, but I’m sure the league wants to get it right.”

The goal waved off was that of Drew Miller.

“I like that idea of an extended replay or like football, a flag or challenge,” Brendan Smith said. “I think we need a few more breaks coming our way. We just can’t say the one against Washington is the only one, there have been several of them. I would like to see a stat of who gets the most disallowed goals. We have to be up there. But we did get a fluky one the last time we played L.A.”

“I don’t know, I think it would be a tough rule, I don’t know how they would do it,” Gustav Nyquist said. “Obviously it probably should have been a goal for sure. But mistakes happen, they have a tough job. I don’t know how you would do it. I think that’s going to be tough to kind of apply to the game.”

Wings’ fourth line seeing increased ice time

DETROIT >> Riley Sheahan’s line couldn’t do it and neither could the line centered by Darren Helm.

The Wings’ fourth line – Drew Miller and Joakim Andersson with Luke Glendening in the middle – did.

Wings coach Mike Babcock had Glendening’s line on the ice every time Anaheim put its second forward line with Ryan Kesler on the ice from the second period on Saturday night and they held him in check.

“For this team to win we’ve got to have 20 competitive guys every single night,” Babcock said after practice Monday at Joe Louis Arena. “If we don’t, we’re going to have a harder time. “I think that line has been one of our best lines two games in a row. They do what they do.”

Normal fourth lines in the NHL average less than 10 minutes a game. Through two games, the Wings’ fourth line is averaging 14 minutes a game.

“They check like crazy, they’re gritty,” Babcock said. “Glenny is a pain in the butt, let’s be honest, done a real nice job. Andy can make plays, he’s a good passer, he’s smart and competes. Millsy is real smart and works hard.

“They all three brought their game and that’s what we have to do,” Babcock continued. “You can’t play your game part way through, you’ve got to bring your game, you’ve got to arrive on time and you’ve got to compete. I think our team has a chance to be lightning fast and be a pain to play against.”

The three forwards, along with Justin Abdelkader, are also on the penalty kill that hasn’t allowed a goal in seven power play chances.

“You try and have as much O-zone time as you can and put pressure on their D,” Miller said. “We all know how to play that role and what our job is. They don’t ask us, I mean we want to score, but we’re not out there on the power play, playing minutes like (Henrik Zetterberg) and (Johan Franzen). We go out there and play our minutes and play our role.”

Glendening also scored a goal in the 3-2 loss to the Ducks.

“We’re a hardworking line, that plays smart and good defensively,” Andersson said. “We’re happy we got a lot of minutes there even though we started on fourth line.”

Glendening: “I think I’m the weak link here.”

DETROIT >> The Wings’ two young centers – Luke Glendening and Riley Sheahan – have struggled mightily in the faceoff circle this series.

“I haven’t been very good,” Glendening said. “I’ve got to be better.”

“Yeah obviously winning draws, you get possession of the puck so they’re big for us and they’re something that we definitely have to do better,” Sheahan said. “We just gotta kind of match their intensity and kind of strategize off of what they do.”

In Thursday’s 3-2 overtime loss in Game 4 to Boston, Glendening won just one of eight faceoffs (11 percent).

“I think everyone else is doing well on our team,” said Glendening, who’s won just 30 percent of the draws through four games. “I think I’m the weak link here. I’ve struggled in the faceoff circle and that’s hurt our team.”

Sheahan is at 38 percent for the series.

“We try to help them with it every day,” Wings coach Mike Babcock said. “We go over it and over it and over it. We show them tendencies. The problem against Boston is they’ve got some good faceoff guys. If you’re Glendening, the coach is the guy who keeps putting you out there against (Patrice) Bergeron. He’s one of the best players in the world. If Pavel (Datsyuk) goes head-to-head with him it’s 50-50. So I don’t know if that’s a big surprise. In saying all that, though, why would you play him against him? Well, what’s my other option? So what we’re doing is Glennie’s mentally tough. He’ll dig in and find a way. We’re hoping it’s sooner than later. We’re hoping it’s not three years from now.

“The same with Riley Sheahan,” Babcock continued. “They’ve got figure out a way to have the puck instead of chasing it. It’s a lot of D-zone time when you’re chasing it. You saw two power play goals last night. I think one took four seconds and the other one took four and half seconds or something. That means you lost the face-off. Faceoffs are a big deal in the game. They add up.”

Wings not getting enough from their veteran players

DETROIT >> The Wings’ veterans have been pretty much silenced through the first three games of their Eastern Conference best-of-seven opening round series with the Boston Bruins.

“When I look at Pavel (Datsyuk), he’s playing against (David) Krejci and (Patrice) Bergeron, two world-class players,” Wings coach Mike Babcock said. “We all know the situation with him, he’s doing what he can on … as healthy as he can, but we need more from everybody.

“I thought we played a good Game 1,” Babcock added. “They’ve responded since that time. We’ve had no push back if you look at the two games.”

Datsyuk and Luke Glendening have the Wings’ goals in the series.

Johan Franzen, Drew Miller and Darren Helm each have an assist.

That’s it point wise for the Wings this series.

“I was disappointed with tonight,” Babcock said. “I wasn’t as disappointed with our game in Boston, I knew they were going to push. But I was disappointed with tonight. We didn’t do a good enough job, whether that be as a coaching staff, we didn’t have them settled down enough, whether we didn’t have enough players digging in. When you go through the whole thing, hard to find guys out there.”

Detroit has been outscored 7-1 since winning the opener 1-0.

“I don’t know about embarrassed, it’s sport, you make mistakes,” Babcock said. “We’ve got to come in tomorrow … I didn’t talk to them tonight after the game at all. We’ll come in tomorrow and get regrouped. We know we’re in a series. They just got the home ice back. We had three home games, we just gave away one. We’ve got to get back in it. But to me, I don’t think there’s ever anything wrong with losing when you maximize your group and did everything you could. That’s why that’s disappointing to me. We’ve been a way better team than that. That’s unacceptable. And that’s not taking away anything from the Bruins.”

The Bruins, who won the Presidents’ Trophy with the league’s overall this season, lost in last year’s Stanley Cup final after winning it two seasons ago.

Asked if experience is playing a role in series Babcock said. “I thought we looked like kids tonight for sure, no question about it.”

Quote of the day … Mike Babcock on Luke Glendening

DETROIT >> Wings coach Mike Babcock on why he’s comfortable with Luke Glendening playing against David Krejci.

“Just ulra-competitive, skater, heavy,” Babcock said. “He used to be a football player, loves the contact, loves being a greaseball. Plays hard. Draws other guys into battles, has great hockey sense. Very competitive.”

Wings’ general manager Ken Holland: “Our guys dug deep.”

DETROIT >> Ken Holland’s philosophy of making sure minor leaguers are “over ripe” before coming to the NHL really paid off.

With a roster filled with a bunch of youngsters, Detroit qualified for the playoffs a 23rd consecutive season after its 4-3 shootout loss to the Pittsburgh Penguins, Wednesday night.

“Establish yourself as a legitimate premier minor league player and then you prove it at the next level,” the Wings’ general manager said during a phone interview Thursday. “That’s how you get to the American League from juniors, or college or Europe. When you’re an established, top notch player, we sign you to a contract to the next level.”

One of the youngsters, Riley Sheahan, scored the tying goal Wednesday that guaranteed the Wings a spot in the postseason for a 23rd consecutive season.

Another youngster, Gustav Nyquist, leads the team with 28 goals and is tied for second in points with 48. And all that came in 55 games.

Tomas Tatar is sixth on the team in scoring with 19 goals and 18 assists, which are two goals and two points ahead of world-class center Pavel Datsyuk.

Then there’s Luke Glendening, who’s been matched up with some of the league’s elite in the closing moments of games.

“Leading the Grand Rapids Griffins last year was Tatar, Nyquist, Riley Sheahan and Luke Glendening so when they got their call they didn’t come up here wondering if they could play they had done it at another level so the next step for them was to go to the NHL,” Holland said. “Now can you do it? I don’t know, but that time in the minors prepares them to be the best that they can be.”

These last two weeks, Glendening has played head-to-head against Pittsburgh’s Sidney Crosby and Boston’s Patrice Bergeron.

“You’re talking Olympic players and we found a way to beat Pittsburgh at home and we beat Boston at home,” Holland said. “We’re 9-3-2 in our last 14 games. Of the nine wins, one’s Pittsburgh, one’s Boston, two huge games against Toronto, we beat a Tampa Bay, a team that we hadn’t in a long time in regulation. Our guys dug deep.”

Prior to 2005, when there was no salary cap, the Wings had more depth than anybody because they had the opportunity to spend way more money than most of the competition.

Since 2005, just two teams have made the playoffs every year, San Jose and Detroit.

“When you have a year with a lot of injuries it probably can affect your ability to win constantly,” Holland said. “The last two years we got hit with a lot of injures. Last year, the core was in the lineup every night and it was a 48-game schedule.

“This was an 82-game schedule,” Holland continued. “The longer the schedule the harder it is to get in. You get more separation over time. We basically got a half year out of (Henrik Zetterberg), a half year out of Pav, we’re probably going to have 25-30 games out for (Jonathan) Ericsson, 15-20 games down for (Danny) DeKeyser and (Johan Franzen) was down for 25-30 games. Stephen Weiss was hurt early and he played injured at the end. We lost him for three quarters of the season. The depth of our organization, through the jobs of our scouts, Jiri Fischer and Jeff Blashill, allowed our kids to come in.”